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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Next thing you know, Red Ryders will be a thing of the past.

http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/business/10481359.htm

You'll shoot your eye out!


Red Ryder BB gun is a Christmas-movie icon, but its maker is careful not to market to kids

[size=-1]By Melissa Nelson[/size]

[size=-1]ASSOCIATED PRESS[/size]


The Red Ryder BB gun is "the Holy Grail of Christmas gifts," according to young Ralphie Parker, who pines for one in the movie A Christmas Story. But Daisy Outdoor Products, which makes the Red Ryder, is shying away from any publicity that suggests the gun is a toy.

Joe Murfin, Daisy's vice president of marketing, was emphatic that BB guns, even if they've been turned into celluloid holiday icons, are not playthings. "They are not purchased by children and should not be used by young people without adult supervision," Murfin said in an interview in which he answered only limited questions about the gun. "A BB gun or an air gun is an appropriate Christmas gift, assuming the parent making the gift is willing to take the time to work with the young person and teach them gun safety and marksmanship."

Toy consultant Chris Byrne isn't surprised that Daisy doesn't boast about the gun's popularity. "Any time you talk about selling guns to kids in today's society, they are pariah," he said.

The gun, named for the comic-strip cowboy Red Ryder, remained a favorite among children for decades and was the inspiration for 1983's A Christmas Story, about a young boy in the 1940s who longs for "an official Red Ryder, carbine action, 200-shot, Range Model air rifle with a compass on the stock and this thing which tells time."

In the movie, little Ralphie is admonished by numerous adults (his mother, his teacher, even a department-store Santa) that "you'll shoot your eye out!"

Despite the cult popularity of the movie, and the zest for Daisy and Red Ryder memorabilia among collectors, the company has shunned publicity for years. Recent negative news could contribute to the company's desire to keep a low profile. Last year, Daisy settled a lawsuit brought by the government that alleged defects in 7.5 million high-velocity, multi-pump pellet-BB rifles marketed to shooters 16 and older. The Consumer Product Safety Commission said BBs could get stuck in some models, leading users to think they're empty and posing a potential hazard. At the time, the commission said at least 15 deaths and 171 serious injuries had been associated with the alleged defect. As part of the settlement, the company agreed to launch a $1.5 million safety campaign and put additional warning labels on its high-powered guns.

Harry Wilson, who teaches political science at Roanoke College in Salem, Va., and is writing a book about gun-control policy, said Daisy's tactics are similar to those of firearm manufacturers that target their niche in trade magazines and on outdoor channels. "They think people who have nostalgia for the BB guns will still go buy them, and they don't want to stir up the other folks," Wilson said.

Daisy collector Neal Punchard, who wrote a retrospective coffee-table book to mark the company's first century, said it is a shame such a venerable American institution has gotten overlooked because of anti-gun backlash. "But then, any way you slice it, they're selling guns to kids," he said.
 

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Mystic Knight of the Sea
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It really irks me that our society has gotten so feminized and afraid of guns. I bought my 5 year old grandson a Daisy for Christmas. He saw my cowboy hat the other day, and he's been talking about wanting a cowboy hat and a gun every since. I already bought my 8 year old grandson a Rossi .22LR rifle/410 shotgun combination last year. He knows how to handle it safely, and I'd rather be around him with a firearm than many adults. It's all how kids are raised, it's not the guns that cause accidents and murders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ditto Pogo. You wanna see somebody jump 10 feet in the air, tell Cephus his grandkids are too young for guns.
 

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Preacher said:
... "They are not purchased by children and should not be used by young people without adult supervision," Murfin said ...
This has been going on for a long time and is getting worse. Thankfully, back when dinosaurs ruled the earth kids weren't dealt with as though they're an endangered species. I really don't remember just how old I was when I was given a Daisy and allowed to run amuck, slaughtering butterflies with wild abandon (quickly found that a Daisy couldn't make a clean kill on lizard). I cannot imagine what a drag it would have been having had a stupid adult in tow to keep an eye on me.

What's really most frightening is that when folks grow up in a culture of safety, they have a mind-set alien to that of folks of my generation. There are folks now who have never ridden a bicycle without a safety helmet on, never ridden a motorcycle without a helmet, never ridden in a car without having a safety belt on, etc., etc., etc. Children now are raised to simply accept the governments power to mandate how they act to make sure they're safe.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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I am looking at my Daisy '73 model as I type this in my "gun room".

I wished it worked. Guess I had too much fun with it.

My wife and I were talking about the Red Ryder. I don't recall that BB gun when I was a kid. First I ever heard of it was the movie.
 
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