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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody know which finish is more rust resistant. Bluing, Blackening, or Parkerizing.
 

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Nothing to draw upon except anecdotal personal experience, but I'd say parkerizing.
 

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Phosphating (people call parkerizing) is the standard for U.S. arms. For even better protection, you phosphate then paint.

Most AK's are assembled, then phosphated, then painted, this leaves areas unprotected like sides of the trunnions, triggerguard and underneath the barrel at the trunnion. The ideal way would be to phosphate all parts, then assemble, then paint.

But there's nothing wrong in just phosphating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So it seems that they all rust if no coating is applied. do the painted surfaces you guys mentioned scratch very easily?
 

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mike26038 said:
Park left unpainted can rust very easily.. Just ask and garand left in a damp place..
Guys, I'm talking about phosphating (NOT PARKERIZING). I have phosphated many guns and never had any problem with rust. I shoot them in the rain, snow and on occasion in a salt environment. No rust! I do take proper care and oil the finish when it becomes dry. If you do phosphating and you get rust your doing something wrong.

Below is a picture of an "old" Stevens 16 ga. pump. I phosphated parts black and gray over 8 years ago. Guess what...no rust. Painting over phosphate just increases the protection. To this day I have yet to paint over one of my phosphating jobs. Right now I'm just painting my AK receivers because I don't have access to a bead blaster. If I did, I'd be phosphating.
 

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WC846 said:
is that process hard to do/
The process is very easy, having the stainless steel tanks and gas burners is something else.

The company RPB used to sell pre-black and phosphating solutions and that's what I'm using now. If I didn't have that I would buy the same stuff from Brownell's.

1.) Remove all coil type springs. Phosphate will crystalize the metal spring and they will break.
2.) Clean all oils from part. There are various chemicals to do this so I won't get into it but the parts must be clean and free of oil.
3.) Bead blast the parts and rinse in clean water. The parts shouldn't be exposed to the air for more than 1 hour prior to phosphating.
4.) Heat phosphate chemical to approximately 190 degrees.
5.) If a black finish is desired, dip in pre-black solution untill part is black. Gently rise in clean water, do not touch or pre-black will come off. If standard grey finish is desired go straight to phosphate tank.
6.) Immerse part in phosphate tank for 20 minutes.
7.) Immerse part in clean boiling water for 1 minute.
8.) Allow to air dry (which doesn't take long) and then brush on oil.

All barrel openings should be plugged prior to phosphating.

That's the proceedure in a nutshell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Jack..how hot do you have to bake that stuff ?
 

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If I order the parkerizing solution and the post solution from Brownells, and the duracoat beginners kit also will those 2 process work together? "Park first then paint"
I am a little confused about the parkerizing part now. If that is not the parkerizing stuff what do I need?
Thanks T M:thankyou:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Are there any books out there somewhere that explains how to do all this stuff ?
 

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mike26038 said:
Call me stupid but I allways belived the phosphating and parkerizing was the same thing??
So did I, until I read about the process by the Parker Company. The big difference was you had to add steel shavings or steel wool the the almost boiling liquid. I did use this type of solution a long time ago but it took to much time to disolve the steel wool in the solution.

I went to straight phosphating after that, much easier. I tried to find the site for reference but wouldn't you know, I couldn't find it.
 

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I just did my first batch of what every the hell it is officially called using the Manganese Heavy Duty from Shooters Solutions.Turned out fine.Parts were blasted with AL Oxide then knocked down a bit with a light glass beading.That site mentions the Parker Chemical company as the inventor of the process.Sounds like it has become generic over the years like Klennex.The stuff they sell is Manganese Phosphate(black) or Zinc Phosphate(grey).Didn't get all the other after solutions just pulled the parts out and put them right into boiling water for a bit since they will be painted after.You just mix to the specs and heat to the specs -no steel wool.Easy. I did it out side but managed to get a breath of the steam when a puff of wind blew it in my face while I was fishing out some small parts .Don't do that.Hot phosphoric acid vapors will irritate your throat. :bawling:
 
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