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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I may have posted the second of these questions before...

I recently traded for a minty Stevens 311 12-gauge side-by-side, to my understanding the last of the US-made doubles. Two questions:

1. The gun doesn't open as much as I'm used to on a double, and has a tendency to not stay quite fully open, making reloading rather clumsy. In mucking about on the 'net I've found that this is endemic to 311's, but haven't found a fix. Anyone know of one?

2. The gun has no serial number. Again, in mucking about on the 'net I've found that this is also common. But it also seems weird. Aren't guns required to have a serial number? The gun isn't an antique: I don't know when it was made, but it has a varnish finish, and generally it wasn't 'tilll the late 60's that (alas) American gun manufacturers began doing that. Can anyone explain how a modern firearm can legally have no serial number. Receiver is color case-hardened, so if it had one removed it would be obvious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Lupe!!! I'll chase down a replacement part first for when I inevitably screw it up.

Again, many thanks!

Now if I could just figure out what the deal is with the serial number. I keep having this recurrent nightmare of having to try to explain to a BATFE agent that it's common for 311's to not have serial numbers. Really a puzzle to me.
 

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Where the forearm frame fits into the front of the receiver is a friction point...
...put some valve grinding compound in both areas
...put the muzzle end of the barrels on the floor
...hold the tang lever open
...open-close the receiver a hundred times or so

Another suggestion to reduce friction ... more grinding compounding to the pin areas of the extractors.

...and slobber up the plunger too... gets the burrs out of the plunger hole

Wipe and clean the grinding compund off, hit it with some of your favorite oil, put a couple of DUMMY shells in and see how it works when you pop the receiver

Stevens 311's are notarious for not fully opening.

I've seen several old guns with no serial number, it ain't a big deal.Before the Gun Control act of 1969 I don't believe that they were required.

Hope this helps.
 

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I have one and it also doesnt have a serial #.As you said,i think manufactures were not reqired to put # on them pre 60;s something.I also have a older Fox/Savage that doesnt have #.
 

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No serial number, no big deal , just?s means your shot gun was made some time before the ?GCA 68" that all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wraith said:
No serial number, no big deal , just?s means your shot gun was made some time before the ?GCA 68" that all.
Yeah, I guess serial numbers were optional before then. Weird, though: I've never seen a modern firearm without a serial number before. Oldest weapon I've got is a 1903 Colt Pocket Hammer .38 ACP, and it's serial numbered. And had a 1918 Luger that had a serial number on just about every part you could get a number punch on.

Now here's a weird spin on this: Wondering if it's legal, then, to remove the serial number of a weapon made prior to the '68 GCA. This question came up for me when I had an old S&W Model 10 engraved. The engraver contended that he could move the serial number to under the grips, but couldn't remove it; in the interests of paranoia, I had it left in place. Now thinking that since the weapon had been made prior to '68, I could have done either since apparently there was no legal requirement for the weapon to even have a serial number in the first place.
 
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