Gunco Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
The whole nine yards is a term that originated during WWII. A 50 cal belt is 9 yards long and a pilot used the term to indicate he had used all of his ammunition to down the enemy plane.
 

·
Class 07 FFL/SOT
Joined
·
6,297 Posts
9 yards of .50 cal ammo,link belted,is 250 rounds.Thats what you wind up into the "Tombstone" ammo cans when you want to warm up the .50 cal BMG barrels.
 

·
Class 07 FFL/SOT
Joined
·
6,297 Posts
Yardage.........

32 yards of whoopass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
that's what I always thought Dinkydow.
But picking up my new suit from my Taylor for a wedding
he says "Yeah, it's ready. Gave you the whole nine yards."
Hmm! Heard that phrase 3 times in one day by various working stiffs. So I thought where did this term come from exactly?
Hell I use it as slang too.

From another site:
What does the saying "the whole nine yards" mean and where did it come from?
Matthew
Plainview, New York
Dear Matthew:
The phrase "the whole nine yards" is commonly used to mean "everything" or "all the way" as in, "This new minivan has a cell phone, dual climate controls, and a dashboard PEZ dispenser -- the whole nine yards." It's sort of like "the whole ball of wax" or "the whole enchilada."

As far as the origin is concerned, that's a bit more difficult to discern. We made the rounds of our Etymology category (under Social Sciences > Linguistics and Languages) and dutifully perused the sites that deal with the history of slang expressions.

Our first stop, Wilton's Word and Phrase Origins, did indeed have an entry devoted to "the whole nine yards," but it offers only theories, no conclusions. Some of the suggested possibilities include: nine yards as the length of cloth needed for a particular garment, nine yards as the length of a machine-gun ammunition belt, and nine yards as the amount of cement held in a typical cement-mixer. Unfortunately, Wilton also notes that these theories are chock full of holes.

Next up was Jesse's Word of the Day, a daily column by Jesse Sheidlower, Senior Editor of Random House's Reference Department. Last November, Jesse tackled the question of "the whole nine yards" and his very succinct answer was "I don't know." He does offer some of the same theories as Wilton, and, in the process, shoots them down. Plus he gives some bonus possibilities: football, ship sails, burial shrouds. We particularly enjoyed Jesse's discussion of the logic involved in debunking these theories.

Finally, when all else fails, we look to the masses for truly outlandish hypotheses. A quick search of DejaNews, the Usenet discussion search engine, lead us to a spirited debate by the denizens of alt.books.david-weber (a sci-fi author). The latest theory seems to be that nine yards is the amount of fabric required to make a Scotsman's kilt.

So we're afraid that the current Internet verdict on the origin of "the whole nine yards" is a resounding "Who knows?"
 

·
Class 07 FFL/SOT
Joined
·
6,297 Posts
Sangrun,I was set up there selling.Had the jeep along (my gun kart).Hell you would prob know me if ya saw me.Been in the businees for over 20 years.
 

·
DADDY WARBUCKS
Joined
·
19,433 Posts
My wife and I own a fair number of books on etymology and related subjects.

It is amazing how often they conflict. I've read enough where I no longer have the confidence to often say how a word, saying or famous quote originated.

It is fun though.
 

·
Class 07 FFL/SOT
Joined
·
6,297 Posts
Party time.............

Look at all that yardage.........makes my ears ring just looking at it all.Soooooooooooooooooo much ammo.........soooooooooo little time.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top