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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
an Eastern Woodland Indian for a spell.

 

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Lupe...........where was this pic taken and what were you doing????
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DorGunR said:
Lupe...........where was this pic taken and what were you doing????
My present backyard..........acting goofy.
 

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Cephus said:
Come on DorGunR he's in the woods , you know that.
Well heck.........mentally I've been in the woods all my life.

What I should have asked was what State.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Cephus said:
He's in a state of undress at least that's what i see.
Lupeloff you look good as a indian.
Can't ya see the leggins. I'm disappointed because you can't see the big ole earing.
 

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He looks Shawnee or Miami. The kind of Indian garb seen around the 1760's in my area. I used to love reading the stories about the indians in the Ohio area when I was a kid and one of the old forts from back in the indian war days was down the road from me. It had been converted into a barn and was just off route 52 or Harrison pike if some of you know that. It was a trail that turned into a road and rumor had it that is was a trail for the indians before settlers came.

Me and me buddy found arrow heads back in the woods where there was this mysterious series of small mounds we dug into. Never found more than a few arrow heads.

BTW: I really dig the rifle and that is on my list of things to build. I want a Kentucky/Pennsylvania rifle of my own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That is an Dixie Gunworks Tennesee Mountain rifle, Flintlock. Only flintlock I had for the photo.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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Sang, in case you have not read it, you need to read the Frontiersman by Alan Eckert, an Ohio State history prof. It is solid history written in novel form. Mostly about Tecumseh and Simon Kenton. The outdoor theatre play Tecumseh is based on it and produced by him.

As a native to the area, you will know just about everyplace mentioned in the book.
 

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Custer said:
Sang, in case you have not read it, you need to read the Frontiersman by Alan Eckert, an Ohio State history prof. It is solid history written in novel form. Mostly about Tecumseh and Simon Kenton. The outdoor theatre play Tecumseh is based on it and produced by him.

As a native to the area, you will know just about everyplace mentioned in the book.

Thanks! I have a history of the Symmes purchase/township which was or is the are that you and I live in before Cincinnati and what not came to be.

The area I grew up in on the farther out westside of Hamilton county is littered with old stone houses and farms. One girl I grew up lived in a house that was built early in the 1700's. Her ancestors graveyard was up the road and is kept as a historical place and some of the people buried in there date back to the 1730's. I can drive around to all the old houses and identify them since my Mom and Dad were so into the history thing and the book I used to have had early maps that showed the homestead loctaions.

Since I was a kid it sad and strange to see the sprawl from Cincinnati develop around these old places, but they still stand and I appreciate houses made from Ohio field stone with log cabins buried in them.

One of my good friends live in a house that was on Mad Anthony Wayne's trail. It was built in the early 1700's and is a log cabin with a house built around it. Some of his walls are 15 inches thick. It's a weird house, but very neat. He took a covering wall down and found a wall with many arrow heads stuck in it as well.
 

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DADDY WARBUCKS
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We still have an original log cabin standing about a mile from my house. Built in 1790 or so. It is owned by the Township historical society and is open to the public.

My house is built on land that was part of an original settler's farm.Portions were sold off over the years for housing development. The last pacel was my neighborhood.

The decendants are friends of ours and live in the original farm house on the top of our street. Their house has been in the family for 200 years or so. It has had the typical add ons and modernizations but you can see much of the original work when you go inside. Many of the streets around here are named after their various family members and kin.

There are also many of the original settlers' families still occupying fairly large tracts around our township. They still follow agricultural or semi agricultural enterprises.

When I first tilled my vegtable garden 20 years ago I found a few arrowheads but have found nothing since. This was Miami and Shawnee territory.
 
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