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Friend of MCMXI
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sounds like a pretty smart guy to me:

http://www.thecountycourier.com/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=1035&Itemid=

Youth hunters belong in Vermont woods javascript:void window.open('http:/...=640,height=480,directories=no,location=no'); javascript:void window.open('http:/...=640,height=480,directories=no,location=no'); Written by Contributor Thursday, 23 December 2004
This is a response to the opinion letter written by Reg West (?Change Youth Hunting in Vermont?, Dec. 9). I completely disagree with his views on youth hunters in Vermont.
He states that youth hunters between the ages of 8 and 11 are not very safe.

All youth hunters have to complete a Department of Fish and Wildlife hunter?s safety course and pass a written exam, as well as a shooting and gun handling test. I also personally know a number of instructors of this course, and I know that one thing they look for is parental/adult involvement during the course whether the child is 8 years old or 15 years old. As a matter of fact, they have asserted to me that a younger child with adult involvement gives them more comfort than the 15 year old who shows up with no adult and passes the test and goes hunting with his other buddies. You need to give the instructors of these courses more credit; they are hunters as well and certainly do not want to release dangerous hunters into the woods. The law reads, ?In addition to satisfactorily completing the hunter education course and obtaining the youth deer hunt tag, a participating young person must hold a valid Vermont hunting license and be accompanied by an unarmed adult over 18 years of age who holds a Vemront hunting license.?


I contacted Ron Frey, who is the Hunter Education Training Coordinator for the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department, to discuss youth hunting accidents. from 1994 to 2004 there have been a total of 59 hunting accidents in the state of Vemront. Of those, four have involved youths under the age of 14, or less than 7 percent of the accidents. None of these youth accidents resulted in a fatality and none of them occurred during any of the youth hunts (deer, turkey and waterfowl).
Another point you make is that because the Department of Fish and Wildlife allows the youth hunter to harvest either a buck or a doe, this doesn?t teach them to be good managers. This is why the Department of Fish and Wildlife employ biologists to manage the deer herd and set the game laws. Your statement also implies that every adult that draws an antlerless muzzleloader tag or the rifle hunter that shoots an 18-month old buck is not learning to be a good manager. We want our youth hunters to be safe, hunt with ethics and always follow the laws, but I don?t believe anybody wants them to determine the overall management practices for the deer herd in this state.
You also make the statement that you would like to see an 8-year-old shoot a high-powered rifle like yours, which is a 7mm Remington Magnum. I have shot a fair number of deer over the years, and not once have I used a rifle as powerful as yours, and I assure you I could handle it if I wanted too. My 8-year-old son shoots a .243 rifle very proficiently at the range and in the field. He harvested a 4-point buck this fall with one shot and it didn?t take a step. Why would I subject my son to the magnum recoil of your gun, which incidentally isn?t made in youth model anyway, when he can humanely harvest deer with his youth model .243. I believe the point you were trying to make was that these youth hunters are not really shooting their own deer. There are always going to be adults that will break the hunting laws. They will break the laws during youth season, archery season, rifle season and muzzleloader season. Because of these few unethical adult hunters are you proposing that we not allow our youth to hunt? Almost all of the deer shot during youth season are shot by youth hunters.
It is apparent to me that you have seen something or had something happen to you during youth season for you to make these statements. Our sport is under constant attack by the anti-hunting regime, and the last thing we need is hunters not wanting to pass on the heritage and tradition of hunting to our youth. I have had the privilege of hunting with a number of youth hunters and have not seen anything but positives. All adult hunters have the responsibility to pass on our hunting heritage. Do yourself and the sport a favor and take a youth hunting; I assure you there is no greater satisfaction. Given the chance and proper instruction, our youth are capable of great things.
Kevin J. Machia
Montgomery
 

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I really don't remember how old I was when I began hunting. Probably around 11 or 12, used to go dove-hunting with my dad and grandpa. Grandpa gave me his Central Arms and Bicycle Works 12-gauge side-by side. Went through a hunter-safety course first, and remember it as having been really good - and went on to become friends with the instructor, who used to take me shooting and who became somewhat of a mentor to me. When I'd go hunting I was supervised enough to teach me how to knock birds out of the air, but that was about it.

Yet about the same time, one of my friends fatally shot his brother in a shooting accident, so I'm not going to try to make a case that it's entirely safe for kids to have guns.

I will make a case that being entirely safe is not a good thing, that "Live free or die" isn't quite right - it should be "Living free is worth the risk of dying."
 

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Dzerzhinsky said:
I will make a case that being entirely safe is not a good thing, that "Live free or die" isn't quite right - it should be "Living free is worth the risk of dying."
Dzerzhinsky you hit that out of the park! I think that is a great motto!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Grendeljaeger said:
Dzerzhinsky you hit that out of the park! I think that is a great motto!!!
I'll agree.
 
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