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Chinese Connection
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
don't real like the 24/47 that much, I like M48 much better, but when I was in the importer's warehouse , look over 100's of them, this one just jump out . I must had it , got it for $250 OTD with my C&R , all match number . almost 100% , barrel is in dark plum color .



By bluejack21 at 2012-03-04


By bluejack21 at 2012-03-04
 

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Chinese Connection
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wish I know , but maybe going back pick up some cheery M48 here soon
 

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That is neat, I think I would have bought it too just because it looks so nice.
 

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Citizen, Patriot, Ranger
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My understanding is that the majority of the rifle stocks for Yugoslavian (and derivative countries like Serbia, Bosnia, etc.) are actually a variety of Beech wood. From the Hardwood database:

Description: Very pale tan to warmer browns. The European beech is a large deciduous forest tree. Veneers are darker colored, as a result of the steaming process required for this cut. Flatsawn surfaces are quite bland, while the quarter-sawn millruns are generally speckled, or flecked. European beech is the most popular hardwood in the United Kingdom.

Location: Central Europe, specifically: Norway, Denmark, Germany, France, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Italy, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Romania.

Common Aliases: Common beech, English beech, French beech, Varlig bok, Rod bok, Yugoslavian beech, European steamed beech.

Performance: Very hard, but can be dimensionally unstable. Beechwood is a utility wood, and has widespread application as a fuel wood. Finishing qualities are good. Beech is easy to work (with the exception of veneer sampling), planes and nails all right, and is suitable for joinery. Beech is an above average utility hardwood.

Common Uses: Lumber, flooring, furnishing, cabinetry, piano pinblocks, plywood, rifle stocks, veneers, turnings.

Yugoslavia was if anything, loyal to their own industries and capabilities. This is why they never chrome plated their rifles when everyone else was jumping all over chrome...Yugoslavia has no domestic source of chrome....

I have found that some of the "surplus SKS stocks" are in fact surplus because they were dimensionally unstable. i.e. they were twisted / warped.
Most are fixable, without taking too much meat out of the stock. About 10% had to be rejected due to splitting of the grain. This comes from my last big deal where I was purchasing complete Cugir SKS actions, and Yugoslavian stocks and mating them... Fortunately for me, I had a good guy selecting the stocks for me in-country, so the rejection rate was low, about 3%.

The sad part of the story is that I barely broke even on the transactions due to the release of a shitload of Yugo, Albanian, and Soviet SKS rifles at the same time. Cugir (Romanian) SKS rifles are vastly superior to the rest in terms of the steel, and fit of the parts. But they sucked moose penis in terms of the finish.

Back to the subject: Yugo Stocks are made of Beech Wood. Teak? Not even close! There were runs of rifles made that did use Teak, but nothing that was ever imported into the US in quantity. Those were all either used for special units, or for export to tropical countries....Africa, not S. America.

Just my $0.02
 

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nice buy! I picked one up at the swap meet awhile ago, mainly bought it because it came with the accessories and ammo. Like a idiot I sold the rifle a week later. jim
 

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I Really like those 24/47's. Yugos's IMHO are vastly under-rated. I bought 2 in January while in the states before I had to return to China to work, since because our "gummmit" does not like to keep jobs at home.

I bought a 24/47 in excellent condition and one with a bent bolt (obviuosly from an M48). The M48s are next on my list when I return stateside.
 

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